Giving Yourself Time

Giving Yourself Time To Recover

  Giving Yourself Time To Recover Lives that were cluttered with destruction and chaos, when actively using, are not necessarily quick to sort out. Oceanside Malibu Treatment Center can guide you to make demonstrable changes necessary in order to both embrace and maintain recovery. Before making outside changes, we must first go inward. Memories and feelings may be overwhelming during the detox phase of treatment. Therefore, it may be helpful to visualize reasonable expectations of what sober feelings and behaviors might begin to look like. Addicts want what they want when they want it. A need for instant gratification defines drug addiction, so the tendency to apply the same idea… Read More

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Being Generous With Your Time

Being Generous With Your Time

  Being Generous With Your Time The smallest act of generosity can have a big impact on the way we view ourselves and the way we view the world around us. We start feeling calmer and becoming kinder to everyone, including ourselves, and we start to feel those benefits right away. By practicing being generous on a daily basis, we develop a giving nature that benefits ourselves and the people around us, which helps us work through the challenges we encounter during the recovery process. A simple word or two can be enough to make or break someone’s day. We can use words wisely. Without being dishonest, we can be… Read More

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Malibu Equine Assisted Therapy

Equine Assisted Therapy

  Equine Assisted Therapy At Oceanside Malibu, clients are afforded the opportunity to attend weekly sessions of equine assisted therapy with lead therapist Mark Frankle, M.A., LMFT.  Equine assisted therapy is said to be both metaphorical and experiential.  According to Mark, “the horses become metaphors for whatever the client is working on.”  All of the client interactions with the horses take place on the ground and in a series of games with no actual riding taking place. Relationships, boundaries, anxiety and approach avoidance can all be observed during simple interactions with the horses such as touching or brushing them and simultaneously being aware of the feelings that come up during… Read More

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Eating Disorder Recovery

Eating Disorder Recovery

Eating Disorder Recovery Addictions and eating disorders are often co-occurring. Sometimes food is the thing one may feel most control over during periods of anxiousness and vulnerability in recovery from alcohol and other drugs. Eating disorders and body image issues which were never present or obvious in the past can also develop while in rehab. As maladaptive behaviors in relation to substance abuse are uncovered and discarded, new coping strategies, such as stringent dieting, compulsive overeating, or binging and purging may take their place. While many of those who struggling with eating disorders and body image issues are women, it can be even more difficult for the minority of men… Read More

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Signs You May Be An Empath

Signs You May Be An Empath Or Highly Sensitive Person

Signs You May Be An Empath Or Highly Sensitive Person An Empath or Highly Sensitive Person (HSP) are people who deeply feel the emotions of those around them. Just as introverts, empaths are likely to feel overwhelmed by crowds and loud noises. They are also prone to feeling drained and completely exhausted to the point of fatigue. Although introverts and empaths share many traits, there are several characteristics that distinguish empaths. An HSP is sensitive to many types of energies, and reacts emotionally to being over-stimulated. It’s not like you cry over spilt milk or anything, you just feel emotions – very deeply. If someone is telling you about an… Read More

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Malibu Opioid Treatment

Why The Brain Loves Opioids

Why The Brain Loves Opioids Societies have long coveted opioids for both the euphoria and the pain relief they provide. When chemists extracted morphine from opium poppies, it quickly became the go-to treatment during the American Civil War. After morphine caused widespread addiction, drug companies invented what they thought was a “non-addictive” substitute: a cough syrup called heroin. That turned out poorly for the 20th century.  Today, prescription opioids, like fentanyl and oxycodone, crowd America’s medicine cabinets and its streets. Opioid overdoses now kill more Americans every year than car accidents. To understand how we arrived here, you’ll need to venture deep into the mind. Here’s why our brains love… Read More

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