Harm Reduction Approach

The Harm Reduction Approach To Treatment

  Harm reduction is an approach to treating addiction that focuses on keeping addicts safe and minimizing death, disease and injury associated with higher risk addictive behavior, while recognizing that the behavior may continue despite the risks. At the conceptual level, harm reduction maintains a value neutral and humanistic view of drug use and the drug user. It focuses on the harms from drug use rather than on the use itself. It does not insist on or object to abstinence and acknowledges the active role of the drug user in harm reduction programs. At the practical level, the aim of harm reduction is to reduce the more immediate harmful consequences… Read More

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Doing What You Love

Doing What You Love

  Doing what you love is an important part of one’s recovery. A successful career choice allows one to express passions and earn income. Working for one company for decades and then retiring with a pension, as past generations did, is history. Corporate loyalty is gone, replaced by a freelance marketplace in which everyone is always hustling for the next project or the next client. Today, when creating a career in any field, you want to find as many ways as you can to generate income. It could be considered ‘taking care of yourself’ by connecting with your passion in life and finding a way to monetize it, in order… Read More

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Giving Yourself Time

Giving Yourself Time To Recover

Lives that were cluttered with destruction and chaos, when actively using, are not necessarily quick to sort out. Oceanside Malibu Treatment Center can guide you to make demonstrable changes necessary in order to both embrace and maintain recovery. Before making outside changes, we must first go inward. Memories and feelings may be overwhelming during the detox phase of treatment. Therefore, it may be helpful to visualize reasonable expectations of what sober feelings and behaviors might begin to look like. Addicts want what they want when they want it. A need for instant gratification defines drug addiction, so the tendency to apply the same idea to one’s recovery wouldn’t be uncommon… Read More

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Anger and Anxiety

The Relationship Between Anger & Anxiety

Anger is not always negative; it can be channeled into positive achievements.  If a particular social condition arouses negative emotions in you, this can motivate you to take the steps necessary to do something about it. Rage, on the other hand, is generally negative, and tends to have no positive aspects.  When rageful outburst become a dependency recurring again and again, it can be destructive to relationships and to personal well-being.  Seeking help to control such emotional issues, whether for you or for someone else, can be challenging. The perceived stigma in addressing anger issues, can cause fear and hesitation. Some of this comes from guilt—the feeling that the condition… Read More

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Being Generous With Your Time

Being Generous With Your Time

The smallest act of generosity can have a big impact on the way we view ourselves and the way we view the world around us. We start feeling calmer and becoming kinder to everyone, including ourselves, and we start to feel those benefits right away. By practicing being generous on a daily basis, we develop a giving nature that benefits ourselves and the people around us, which helps us work through the challenges we encounter during the recovery process. A simple word or two can be enough to make or break someone’s day. We can use words wisely. Without being dishonest, we can be generous in the things we say,… Read More

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The Influence Of Friends On What You Think & Do (Small)

The Influence Of Friends On What You Think & Do

Imagine a scenario where all your friends are jumping off a cliff. If everyone jumps, do you jump as well? We know that the correct answer is supposed to be: “No, never! I am an independent thinker, and other people have no influence over me.” However, the truthful answer is, yeah, maybe you do jump. Everyone thinks they’re the exception here. We cannot suppress our human desire to fit in. Humans are social creatures, and our brain seems to be built to follow what other people are doing. When everyone else is participating in something, we tend to think it’s the smart thing to do. Back in the day, when… Read More

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