recovery journey

The Recovery Journey

The Recovery Journey Sobriety gives us the ability and skills to deal with the “normal” issues we face in life: loss of loved ones, loss of relationships, empty nesting, career changes, physical impairment, and grieving. Recovery is a process not an event. Life is a continuum of ever-deepening circles. Put those two ideas together and we begin to understand what growing old sober might look like. In life, discovery often precedes recovery. You wake up one morning and realize, “Oh, that’s what that’s all about. We live life forward and understand it backwards. Recovery goes through stages, even as life does. In the beginning, we have an early awareness and… Read More

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higher power

Why Would Someone Need A Higher Power?

  Why Would Someone Need A Higher Power? It’s common, and often times necessary, for people on the journey of addiction recovery to desire a connection with a higher power. Sometimes, simply strengthening and refining our relationship to the house of worship from our upbringing can fulfill our need for connection with a higher power. In addition to rehabilitation treatment and support received from loved ones, this relationship provides a source of stability and support that allows an addict to heal. Through prayer and attending worship services, an addict with a sincerely held religious belief can redefine his/her life and gain a new sense of purpose. As addicts, however, we… Read More

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Outpatient Treatment

How Outpatient Treatment Helps The Chronic Relapser

  How Outpatient Treatment Helps The Chronic Relapser Treatment facility professionals will usually discuss with patients and their families, the need for outpatient treatment.  You may have heard the terms extended treatment or sober living after completing the initial detox portion of a program.  The reason for this is results.  It has been shown that completing a full continuum of care helps patients remain clean after treatment. Outpatient treatment is especially helpful for people who have been to many treatment centers for addiction and have repeatedly relapsed. There is benefit for everyone to participate in an extended care treatment program.  It may however, be particularly helpful for young adults and… Read More

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Addiction & Relationships

Why A Relationship May Be Difficult For An Addict

  Why A Relationship May Be Difficult For An Addict An addiction is a relationship. When someone is addicted to a substance and/or a behavior, that person is in a relationship with their substance or behavior of choice, the same as if they were involved with a person. Further, the relationship with the object of their addiction is the most important relationship in his/her life. He or she will do anything to protect that relationship and keep it alive, i.e. deny it, lie about it, cover it up, minimize it, blame others, etc. When a person with an addiction enters into a significant relationship, he or she is not entering… Read More

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treating core issues

The Importance Of Addressing Your Core Issues

  The Importance Of Addressing Your Core Issues The average approach to substance abuse treatment for the past several decades has been a crash course on the 12 steps. There is no doubt that the 12 steps provided a much needed solution to issues related to alcoholism, however AA’s stated intention was not to discount or deny the importance of treating core issues as an adjunct to the 12 steps. Moreover, Alcoholics Anonymous was to be forever non-professional, with the stated primary purpose “ to stay sober and help other alcoholics to achieve sobriety.” The vast majority of the treatment industry has been teaching the 12 steps as the primary… Read More

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Alcoholics Anonymous

Alcoholics Anonymous

  Alcoholics Anonymous Participation in Alcoholics Anonymous often brings a sense of connectivity, safety and support. Membership in this community can provide an opportunity for an addict to acquire a substitute self-object, filling an unmet need from infancy and childhood. AA may serve as an omnipotent transitional object, an integral ingredient in helping make the transition from ingesting self-soothing substances to sudden abstinence bearable. When AA members speak about their devotion to ‘working the program’, they may be speaking less about AA principles and more about finding a power (AA) strong enough to compete with their drug of choice. Psychology often emphasizes the need for others to help maintain self-esteem,… Read More

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